Tradition

Blog, Sound & Video

Spot the Korrigans !


I told you I was back into video, and tha I had plenty of ideas ! (so remember if not done yet, to subscribe to our channel, or even share it, there’s plenty more we could do on the channel once we hit a certain amount of subscribers 🙂 http://tinyurl.com/y4ugdtlo )

So here’s my latest short fun video with my favorite and very cooperative actor 🙂

Watch carefully !

How many Korrigans were you able to spot? 😉

Korrigans are little magical creatures found in Brittany mostly in remote magical places like stone circles, wells, hidden springs… They could relate to pixies in a certain way, they tend to be fun and happy, though it’s rather unsure whether their interactions with humans can be positive or negative!
In any case they tend to hide from humans, so it’s quite rare to spot them on their daily life.

Unlike gnomes for instance, they generally don’t live in houses or human settlements, they aren’t as far as one knows attached to any particular house or family. It’s said that they can sometimes be caught forming big circles and dancing under the moonshine. They can grant wishes to humans, but it’s generally not advised to go for it as they’re quite good at tricking you! We supposed that they got a bit grampy and prefer to hide from humans since they aren’t many places they can harmoniously share because of heavy agriculture, buildings and road constructions. Maybe it could also be because they hide their treasures, as it’s said they can create their own gold!

They’re plenty of categories and names for Korrigans, depending on where they live or where they hang, their size and style may vary as well. I have to confess I haven’t met enough of them to be that accurate about the categories 🙂

They have inspired many artists, the most famous one being maybe Pascal Moguerou, that has created numerous illustrations for books, postcards, or posters that can be found in any good stationery or souvenir shop in Brittany. All of his books are like precious beautiful grimoires.

Music is a traditional “fisel” dance played some years ago by Yann, and even I can tell that he doesn’t mix and edit music on the same way anymore!

The video was filmed in June 2019, in a “secret” location in Carnac 🙂 But we’ll reveal that special one very soon, stay tuned! Maybe another time I could share about other magical creatures, we’re trying to attract a Teuz to our house. A Teuz is also small in size, but they use to live with humans, and they would help them with daily cleaning and tidying in the house and the farm! Not kidding!

Thanks for watching and caring, you keep us going!

* Simone.

Note : Links may be affiliated for some of them (on Amazon for instance). As a friend of Astrakan Project, you allow us to earn a small commission if you make a purchase through our affiliate/referral links. This doesn’t affect you in any way in the checkout process. Thank you for supporting our creative journey!

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Pics on Tour

Passing along our Music passion to next generation!


While reviewing some pictures we have on our hard-drive to see if we could use some of them for next album booklet (What? There will be a booklet? Hum…. ), I just got a hand back on a couple of pictures taken last month in Portugal, during a little “atelier” we had been invited to lead for young children.

Those experiences are always very rewarding, children generally don’t have expectations other than having fun. But when it comes to traditional music, it has a very special taste. Traditional musics are people’s music, often unwritten, sometimes with little access to main media such as tv or national radios, they only exist because they are passed along from generation to generation.

In Brittany, children will generally participate to fest-noz (breton ballroom), try to dance, maybe stay for a while at the front row with their little elbows against the stage… although in most of cases just run around and have fun. One thing is for sure, the music they will have heard for years will be their music, it will resonate as being part of who they are forever. Not because it’s a fashion or because it supposed to be “good” music. No. Just because it’s what they have experienced.

§ Simone

PS : if you watch carefully the pictures, you might even guess which one is our little son!

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Musicians' Diary

Tradition: freedom of evolution vs. Museum gate keepers


While searching my pile of lyrics a couple of days ago, I fund that printed copy:

image

It’s the first version of 1932 I got back in 2004 while I was studying with Erik Marchand.

It’s a messy piece of paper. With notes from various projects I used it for. With rhythm variations. With pronunciation variations.

An time I attended workshops, I always noticed singers had the same kind of messy lyrics. It feels like even when we type them into our text editor, as soon as they get printed, we need to mess them around.

Certainly it has a strong connection with the fear we all have that it would make it “the” ultimate version. For centuries songs have evolved, people would forget about some parts, then re-invent them, or just adapt some parts to the way they would pronounce them, or feel that it would sound even better with some little changes…

Public writer, Italy, ca. 1865

Being able to make mistakes, to forget, admitting that there is never one truth but only individuals, that tradition is not one, but made of many people bringing their own interpretation together, this is also what has made my singing journey so fulfilling and ever-surpriing so far.

§ Simone

 

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